The Atypical HUS Foundation

Hey all--

As I am listening to Aiden ask for Macaroni and Cheese (for the second time today!) I find that it has 700mg of Sodium per serving! (this is the easy mac variety). I know that most processed foods are high in sodium but prior to our last dialysis clinic appointment they were completely unconcerned about Aiden's sodium intake saying, just let him eat whatever he wants and give Calcium Carbonate with the dairy! Now, since we are having bp probs we are having to keep an eye on sodium and you know how it goes when you try to mess with a toddler's favorite foods! I am looking for recipes for some of Aiden's faves or brand names of some that maybe y'all have used....Any help would be appreciated...I also thought this would be a great place to share all varieties of dialysis/renal healthy recipes....but they better be yummy!! :)

Aiden's Faves that I'm looking for:

Waffles
Popcorn
Hot Dogs (we can boil these to get most of the sodium out)
Mac and Cheese
Chicken Nuggets ( I can make these myself for him and cut down the sodium but just wanted to know if y'all had any good variations)
Fries (same as above)
quesadillas
Crackers (i know they have low sodium but so far he's not impressed!)

I'm sure there are others but any ideas are appreciated. He wants to eat the same things over and over and I think his bp elevation and weight gain may have been triggered by a run of "I want a hot dog, mama!"

Poor thing, he just loooooves pickles and cheetos...I keep telling him we are out! :(

Thanks!
Christy

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I thought I'd post this 'weight gain' product that I really liked, it was pretty tasty and could porbably be incorporated into a dessert...tasted like melted vanilla ice cream to me!
SCANDISHAKE calorie-rich shake mix is designed to assist patients who need to gain or maintain weight. Mixed with 8 ounces of whole milk, a single serving of SCANDISHAKE® contains approximately 600 calories!
http://www.allegromedical.com//dietary-supplements-c522/scandishake...
Hey Christy,
I finally found a neat little place for kidney diet info, and a renal cookbook is listed as well:
http://www.kidneykids.org/resources_usefulsites_living.htm

Hello!  I have sodium issues as well.  As far as fries go - it's very easy to make your own.  What I do is peel the potatoes, cut them, coat them with olive oil and a mrs dash seasoning he would like - I've always like the fiesta lime.  Whole foods also has french fries that are instant and have VERY low sodium. 

Popcorn has always been easy.  You have to get the kernals in the bag and pop them with either a popcorn maker or in a pan.  Just don't add salt.  You can add a little bit of melted butter or margerine.

 

Some of these others I really can't eat since I have a wheat allergy.  Check out mrsdash.com and see what he would like - they also have low potassium recipes.  I also like the idea of talking with the hospital dietician on this.  It has to be tough with low sodium diet and kids. I hope this helps even though I'm VERY late replying.  :)

Thanks, Jaime...never too late for good ideas and encouragement!  ;D

Jaime Lauck said:

Hello!  I have sodium issues as well.  As far as fries go - it's very easy to make your own.  What I do is peel the potatoes, cut them, coat them with olive oil and a mrs dash seasoning he would like - I've always like the fiesta lime.  Whole foods also has french fries that are instant and have VERY low sodium. 

Popcorn has always been easy.  You have to get the kernals in the bag and pop them with either a popcorn maker or in a pan.  Just don't add salt.  You can add a little bit of melted butter or margerine.

 

Some of these others I really can't eat since I have a wheat allergy.  Check out mrsdash.com and see what he would like - they also have low potassium recipes.  I also like the idea of talking with the hospital dietician on this.  It has to be tough with low sodium diet and kids. I hope this helps even though I'm VERY late replying.  :)

Jaime,

 

We like doing the popcorn thing too, Nathan likes his with a little pepper!  Also, when doing potatoes if you have mpotassium issues you can soak the potatoes for a couple of hours and the potassium leaks out into the water.
Linda Burke said:

Thanks, Jaime...never too late for good ideas and encouragement!  ;D

Jaime Lauck said:

Hello!  I have sodium issues as well.  As far as fries go - it's very easy to make your own.  What I do is peel the potatoes, cut them, coat them with olive oil and a mrs dash seasoning he would like - I've always like the fiesta lime.  Whole foods also has french fries that are instant and have VERY low sodium. 

Popcorn has always been easy.  You have to get the kernals in the bag and pop them with either a popcorn maker or in a pan.  Just don't add salt.  You can add a little bit of melted butter or margerine.

 

Some of these others I really can't eat since I have a wheat allergy.  Check out mrsdash.com and see what he would like - they also have low potassium recipes.  I also like the idea of talking with the hospital dietician on this.  It has to be tough with low sodium diet and kids. I hope this helps even though I'm VERY late replying.  :)

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Did you know...

CFH (Serum Complement Factor H) is a regulatory protein. The secreted protein product of CFH consists of 20 repetitive units named "short consensus repeats" or SCRs (each approximately 60 amino acids). In patients with aHUS the last 5 "pearls" in the twenty pearl strand protein, SCR16 - SCR20, should bind to protect cells but do not- they are defective in one or more of the last 5 SCR locations. If they cannot bind or stick to the kidney to protect that tissue, the platelets clump into clots that affect the glomeruli of the kidney -potentially causing acute renal failure.
  
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It is estimated that there are about 300 cases of aHUS in the U.S., and it is most common with young children. The condition is life threatening and either can be chronic or can recur at intervals.
  
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